mrs claus pictureWhile Santa can trace his roots back hundreds of years to Saint Nicholas, Mrs. Claus has a much shorter history. Here’s what Wikipedia has to say about her evolution:

The wife of Santa Claus is first mentioned in the short story “A Christmas Legend” (1849), by James Rees, a Philadelphia-based Christian missionary. In the story, an old man and woman, both carrying a bundle on the back, are given shelter in a home on Christmas eve as weary travelers. The next morning, the children of the house find an abundance of gifts for them, and the couple is revealed to be not “old Santa Claus and his wife”, but the hosts’ long-lost elder daughter and her husband in disguise.

Mrs. Santa Claus is mentioned by name in the pages of the Yale Literary Magazine in 1851, where the student author (whose name is given only as “A. B.”) writes of the appearance of Santa Claus at a Christmas party: “[I]n bounded that jolly, fat and funny old elf, Santa Claus. His array was indescribably fantastic. He seemed to have done his best; and we should think, had Mrs. Santa Claus to help him.” A

n account of a Christmas musicale at the State Lunatic Asylum in Utica, New York in 1854 included an appearance by Mrs. Santa Claus, with baby in arms, who danced to a holiday song. A passing references to Mrs. Santa Claus was made in an essay in Harper’s Magazine in 1862, and in the comic novel The Metropolites (1864) by Robert St. Clar, she appears in a woman’s dream, wearing “Hessian high boots, a dozen of short, red petticoats, an old, large, straw bonnet” and bringing the woman a wide selection of finery to wear.

A woman who may or may not be Mrs. Santa Claus appeared in the children’s book Lill in Santa Claus Land and Other Stories by Ellis Towne, Sophie May and Ella Farman, published in Boston in 1878… Santa Claus’ wife made her most active appearance yet by Katherine Lee Bates in her poem “Goody Santa Claus on a Sleigh Ride” (1889).

“Goody” is short for “Goodwife” or “Mrs.” In Bates’ poem, Mrs. Claus wheedles a Christmas Eve sleigh-ride from a reluctant Santa in recompense for tending their toy and bonbon laden Christmas trees, their Thanksgiving turkeys, and their “rainbow chickens” that lay Easter eggs. Once away, Mrs. Claus steadies the reindeer while Santa goes about his work descending chimneys to deliver gifts. She begs Santa to permit her to descend a chimney. Santa grudingly grants her request and she descends a chimney to mend a poor child’s tattered stocking and to fill it with gifts. Once the task is completed, the Clauses return to their Arctic home. At the end of the poem, Mrs. Claus remarks that she is the “gladdest of the glad” because she has had her “own sweet will”.

The 1956 popular song by George Melachrino, “Mrs. Santa Claus,” helped standardize and establish the character and role in the popular imagination.

From Wikipedia article on Mrs. Claus.